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FINCA BACARAT RISARALDA, COLOMBIA 250gr Öğütülmemiş 1kg Öğütülmemiş

FINCA BACARAT RISARALDA, COLOMBIA

hazelnut, coconut, milk chocolate.

Region: El pital de Combia, Risaralda
Farm: Finca Bacarat
Farmer: Reynel & Damien Coisne
Variety: castillo
Process: Washed
Altitude: 1400 m
Harvest: 2020-2021 
Supplier: Belco


Espresso/Brew 

PRODUCT CODE : RISACOL

250 gr Whole Bean :

127.00

1 kg Whole Bean :

465.00
FINCA BACARAT RISARALDA, COLOMBIA
FINCA BACARAT RISARALDA, COLOMBIA
FINCA BACARAT RISARALDA, COLOMBIA
DETAY
region-icon
El pital de Combia, Risaralda
farm-icon
Finca Bacarat
variety-icon
castillo
process-icon
Washed
altitude-icon
1400 m
harvest-icon
2020-2021

Notes Of A Roaster From The Underground: hazelnut, coconut, milk chocolate

omniroast     Omni-roast (Espresso/Brew)

 

 

Bacarat coffee is a very fruity and tangy coffee with notes of white fruit, tangerine and green apple. Cultivated at 1400 masl, the coffee beans are picked manually during the 7 to 8 passages for the harvest. These are 3 to 4 pickers who work on the farm during the main harvest which takes place from mid-October to mid-December. French doctor living in

Bordeaux, the owner of the farm, Daniel Coisne, has chosen to surround himself with his Colombian heart brother Reynel  to carry out the production of his coffee there, in Colombia.

Finca Bacarat means "typical farm". And it bears its name well, because the farm is indeed very typical of the region – while producing an atypical coffee! Located in the municipality of El Pital de Combia, in the region of Risaralda, this plantation covering about 5 hectares has two plots: "Bacarat" and "El Pital". It is a small farm that produced just 7 bags of cherries this year, harvested by hand in 7 to 8 pickings. Traditional methods are still used to preserve coffee quality and authenticity. The farm is located at an altitude of 1,400 metres and benefits from shade provided by plantain bananas and ice-cream beans .

kolombiya-header

 

History

Coffee came to Colombia in the late 1700s by way of Jesuit priests who were among the Spanish colonists, and the first plantings were in the north of the country, in the Santander and Boyaca departments. Throughout the 19th century, coffee plants spread through the country, with a smaller average farm size than more commonly found throughout other Latin American producing countries.

Commercial production and export of coffee started in the first decade of the 1800s, but remained somewhat limited until the 20th century: The 1927 establishment of the Federación Nacional de Cafeteros de Colombia (aka FNC, see below) was a tremendous boost to the national coffee industry, and Colombia quickly established itself as a major coffee-growing region, vying with Brazil and Vietnam for the title of top global producer.

Colombia still produces exclusively Arabica coffee, and though the country suffered setbacks and lower yields from an outbreak of coffee-leaf rust in the early 2010s, production has fairly bounced back thanks to the development and spread of disease-resistant plants, as well as aggressive treatment and preventative techniques.


colombia-map

 

Regionality

 

Colombia’s size alone certainly contributes to the different profiles that its 20 coffee-growing departments (out of a total 32) express in the cup, but even within growing regions there are plentiful variations due to the microclimates created by mountainous terrain, wind patterns, proximity to the Equator, and, of course, differences in varieties and processing techniques.

The country’s northern regions (e.g. Santa Marta and Santander) with their higher temperatures and lower altitudes, offer full-bodied coffees with less brightness and snap; the central “coffee belt” of Antioquia, Caldas, and Quindio among others, where the bulk of the country’s production lies, produce those easy-drinking “breakfast blend” types, with soft nuttiness and big sweetness but low acidity. The southwestern departments of Nariño, Cauca, and Huila tend to have higher altitude farms, which comes through in more complex acidity and heightened florality in the profiles.

To capitalize on this broad spectrum of flavors and to emphasize the diversity available to roasters and consumers from within a single country, the coffee growers’ association has begun to provide origin distinctions, and has developed aggressive marketing campaigns designed to boost the regions’ signals to buyers worldwide.

 

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