extra discounts and more for coffee subscription,   

SUBSCRIBE NOW
BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL

BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL

hazelnut, caramel, chocolate, roasted almond and almond milk

Region: Mococa, Sao Paulo
Farm: Fazenda Ambiental Fortaleza
Farmer: Croce Family
Variety: yellow bourbon
Process: Natural
Altitude: 1100 m
Harvest: 2020/2021

 

Espresso/Brew 

PRODUCT CODE : BOb O LINK-2

250 gr Whole bean :

133.00

1kg whole bean :

482.00
BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL
BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL
BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL
DETAY
region-icon
Mococa, Sao Paulo
farm-icon
Fazenda Ambiental Fortaleza
variety-icon
yellow bourbon
process-icon
Natural
altitude-icon
1100m
harvest-icon
2020

Notes Of A Roaster From The Underground: hazelnut, caramel, chocolate, roasted almond and almond milk

omniroast      Omni-roast (Espresso/Brew)

 

OMNIROAST or "absolute peak". We do not have different roasting profiles for espresso and drip brewing methods. We believe in their harmony. We underline the fact that you do not have to drink burnt coffee if you are drinking espresso or "sour" coffee if you are drinking drip coffee. Highlighting a cliche: "One day everybody will roast omni".

 

BOB O LINK YELLOW BOURBON, BRASIL

 

The project carried out by FAF (Fazenda Ambiental Fortaleza) and Croce Family in Brazil give a new image and a positive impact on production in a country where intensive agriculture and monoculture are the norm. BOB O LINK, another face of Brazil: Firstly, this funny name is a name of an endemic migratory bird of Brazil, endangered. It migrates every year between the USA and Brazil but unfortunately no longer finds the food resources necessary for its period of migration because of intensive monoculture. This bird is above all a symbol. The BOB O LINK project is an integral quality, whether at the environmental, social or cup quality level. Initiated at FAF by the Croce family who created a concept farm, this project was then duplicated in more than 50 neighboring farms. Concretely, the actions put in place as a priority when joining the project are:

Reforestation

+

Polyculture

+

Protection of waterways

+

Training of teams

+

A more global change of lifestyle that begins with the ban on sodas, the provision of fresh fruit juice at will, a healthier diet! It is a philosophy / global approach that places coffee at the center of a project of life, nature and its maintenance. An innovative vision that recreates value by diversifying crops and therefore sources of income. 

In addition, Brazilian producers registered in a family farming scheme, far from Brazilian standards, see this project as an innovative solution to stand out. Do little but do well and value each culture! 

Mococa

The Mococa terroir was the breeding ground for the Bob-o-Link project, since it was here, at the heart of their farm, that Marcos Croce and Silvia Barretto got the ambitious Bob-O-Link project off the ground. On returning from the United States to take over the reins of the family farm, run initially as an intensive monoculture, the couple made the courageous choice to start from scratch, symbolically renaming the farm "Fazenda Ambiental Fortaleza". With the aim of obtaining much more than just a specialty coffee, ylvia and Marcos put all their energy into learning about coffee farming and into bringing their neighbours together around their project to obtain a "global quality" for all. They wanted to produce an economically, ecologically and socially sustainable coffee. A very difficult challenge indeed in a great coffee-producing country like Brazil, but one they are currently meeting. What was originally a farm project has now become a way of life for the 50 neighbouring coffee farmers involved in the production of Bob-o-Link coffee. Using the FAF as a model, these farms follow and adopt a quality charter aimed at achieving sustainable production through environmentally-friendly practices while ensuring farm profitability and providing excellent quality coffee. All member farms undertake to not use any chemicals, to plant shade trees for their coffee bushes and for the farm, to create irrigation canals to preserve water, to install African beds and sorting machines at their farms, to harvest selectively by hand and to learn coffee cupping techniques to play an active role in improving quality. Partner farms must also be engaged in alternative forms of  agricultural production to avoid being dependent on a single crop (honey, milk, fruit and vegetables, etc.). The quality of water, soil, biodiversity, workers' health and education are monitored, as well as the economic health of each farm, the transparency of their operations and the quality of their coffee. We place a strong focus at Belco on the commitment of our producers, which is why we have supported this ambitious and courageous Bob-o-Link project for many years. It proves that it is possible to promote a different and sustainable coffee growing model while ensuring consistent and optimum quality, even in one of the largest coffee-producing countries in the world.

 

brazil-sm-header

 

History

It’s hard to imagine the “beginnings” of coffee in Brazil, as the two things have become so synonymous. The first coffee plants were reportedly brought in the relatively early 18th century, spreading from the northern state of Pará in 1727 all the way down to Rio de Janerio within 50 years. Initially, coffee was grown almost exclusively for domestic consumption by European colonists, but as demand for coffee began to increase in United States and on the European continent in the early-mid 19th century, coffee supplies elsewhere in the world started to decline: Major outbreaks of coffee-leaf rust practically decimated the coffee-growing powerhouses of Java and Ceylon, creating an opening for the burgeoning coffee industry in Central and South America. Brazil’s size and the variety of its landscapes and microclimates showed incredible production potential, and its proximity to the United States made it an obvious and convenient export-import partner for the Western market.

In 1820, Brazil was already producing 30 percent of the world’s coffee supply, but by 1920, it accounted for 80 percent of the global total.

 


39527-brazilwebmap (1)

Since the 19th century, the weather in Brazil has been one of the liveliest topics of discussion among traders and brokers, and a major deciding factor in the global market trends and pricing that affect the coffee-commodity market. Incidents of frost and heavy rains have caused coffee yields to wax and wane over the past few decades, but the country is holding strong as one of the two largest coffee producers annually, along with Colombia.

One of the other interesting things Brazil has contributed to coffee worldwide is the number of varieties, mutant-hybrids, and cultivars that have sprung from here, either spontaneously or by laboratory creation. Caturra (a dwarf mutation of Bourbon variety), Maragogype (an oversize Typica derivative), and Mundo Novo (a Bourbon-Typica that is also a parent plant of Catuai, developed by Brazilian agro-scientists) are only a few of the seemingly countless coffee types that originated in Brazil and, now, spread among coffee-growing countries everywhere.

 

brazil-origin2

 

Picking and Processing 

It’s hard to imagine the “beginnings” of coffee in Brazil, as the two things have become so synonymous. The first coffee plants were reportedly brought in the relatively early 18th century, spreading from the northern state of Pará in 1727 all the way down to Rio de Janerio within 50 years. Initially, coffee was grown almost exclusively for domestic consumption by European colonists, but as demand for coffee began to increase in United States and on the European continent in the early-mid 19th century, coffee supplies elsewhere in the world started to decline: Major outbreaks of coffee-leaf rust practically decimated the coffee-growing powerhouses of Java and Ceylon, creating an opening for the burgeoning coffee industry in Central and South America. Brazil’s size and the variety of its landscapes and microclimates showed incredible production potential, and its proximity to the United States made it an obvious and convenient export-import partner for the Western market.

In 1820, Brazil was already producing 30 percent of the world’s coffee supply, but by 1920, it accounted for 80 percent of the global total.

Since the 19th century, the weather in Brazil has been one of the liveliest topics of discussion among traders and brokers, and a major deciding factor in the global market trends and pricing that affect the coffee-commodity market. Incidents of frost and heavy rains have caused coffee yields to wax and wane over the past few decades, but the country is holding strong as one of the two largest coffee producers annually, along with Colombia.

One of the other interesting things Brazil has contributed to coffee worldwide is the number of varieties, mutant-hybrids, and cultivars that have sprung from here, either spontaneously or by laboratory creation. Caturra (a dwarf mutation of Bourbon variety), Maragogype (an oversize Typica derivative), and Mundo Novo (a Bourbon-Typica that is also a parent plant of Catuai, developed by Brazilian agro-scientists) are only a few of the seemingly countless coffee types that originated in Brazil and, now, spread among coffee-growing countries everywhere.

 

brazil-origin-1

 

SIMILAR PRODUCTS

CAYAO SEGUNDO MICROLOT, PERU
CAYAO SEGUNDO MICROLOT, PERU
lemon, hazelnut, red berries, tangerine peel
141. 00
529. 00
ADD TO BASKET
OUT OF STOCK

extra discounts and more for coffee subscription,   

SUBSCRIBE NOW
Güvenli Alışveriş