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ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL

ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL

fresh tobacco, lemon, orange, chocolate

Region: Mogiana
Variety: cataui, paraiso
Process: Washed
Altitude: 1200 m
Harvest: 2020 - 2021

 

Espresso/Brew 

PRODUCT CODE : BR01

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ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL
ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL
ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL
DETAY
region-icon
Mogiana
farm-icon
Various Prooducers
variety-icon
cataui, paraiso
process-icon
Washed
altitude-icon
1200m
harvest-icon
2020-2021

Notes Of A Roaster From The Underground: fresh tobacco, lemon, orange, chocolate

omniroast      Omni-roast (Espresso/Brew)

 

OMNIROAST or "absolute peak". We do not have different roasting profiles for espresso and drip brewing methods. We believe in their harmony. We underline the fact that you do not have to drink burnt coffee if you are drinking espresso or "sour" coffee if you are drinking drip coffee. Highlighting a cliche: "One day everybody will roast omni".

 

ANHUMAS MOGIANA, BRASIL

 

Anhumas coffee comes from the production of 14 small family farms (8-10 hectares on average) along the Anhumas valley. Moreover the name Anhumas comes both from a bird endemic to Brazil from the river that crosses this valley. Cleiton Mapelli's Fazenda Anhumas was the pilot farm for this project. Located near the city of Mococa, he is the 4th generation of coffee growers. His grandparents, Italian immigrants, worked as pickers in the region. In 1954, they were able to buy their first farm. This story is a classic illustration of the farms in the region. This growing project includes new farms from the valley every year as long as they take part in their shared sustainable approach. Anhumas is a varietal blend mainly composed of catuai, obata, mundo novo and icatu. The
coffees are dried on patios. In his farm, Cleiton manages intercrops and does not use herbicides. Moreover, all the producers taking part in this project are sensitive to sustainable agricultural methods and put in place water treatment practices to preserve their shared environment.
- Traceability on 14 family-sized farms, 8-10 hectares on average
- Sustainable agricultural practices

THE REGION OF MOGIANA

 

In the state of Sao Paulo, you cand find one of the most known region of Brazil: Mogiana. It is in this area that the first coffee farm was founded in 1817 in the Paraiba Valley. In Sao Paulo state there is the Santos harbour which is the main exporting port of Brazil. The state of sao Paulo is composed of two main areas of coffee production : Mogiana and West center.
Mogiana region bears the name of a railway company "Companhia Mogiana de Estradas de Ferro", which created the "railway of coffee" in 1883. This improved considerably transport but also the increase of coffee production in the area.
Mogiana has great altitude between 800 and 1100 meters, a constant temperature about 20°C all year long and hilly lands. It is a great terroir to produce coffee with good quality and a cup profile regular well balanced and sweet.

brazil-sm-header

 

History

It’s hard to imagine the “beginnings” of coffee in Brazil, as the two things have become so synonymous. The first coffee plants were reportedly brought in the relatively early 18th century, spreading from the northern state of Pará in 1727 all the way down to Rio de Janerio within 50 years. Initially, coffee was grown almost exclusively for domestic consumption by European colonists, but as demand for coffee began to increase in United States and on the European continent in the early-mid 19th century, coffee supplies elsewhere in the world started to decline: Major outbreaks of coffee-leaf rust practically decimated the coffee-growing powerhouses of Java and Ceylon, creating an opening for the burgeoning coffee industry in Central and South America. Brazil’s size and the variety of its landscapes and microclimates showed incredible production potential, and its proximity to the United States made it an obvious and convenient export-import partner for the Western market.

In 1820, Brazil was already producing 30 percent of the world’s coffee supply, but by 1920, it accounted for 80 percent of the global total.

 


39527-brazilwebmap (1)

Since the 19th century, the weather in Brazil has been one of the liveliest topics of discussion among traders and brokers, and a major deciding factor in the global market trends and pricing that affect the coffee-commodity market. Incidents of frost and heavy rains have caused coffee yields to wax and wane over the past few decades, but the country is holding strong as one of the two largest coffee producers annually, along with Colombia.

One of the other interesting things Brazil has contributed to coffee worldwide is the number of varieties, mutant-hybrids, and cultivars that have sprung from here, either spontaneously or by laboratory creation. Caturra (a dwarf mutation of Bourbon variety), Maragogype (an oversize Typica derivative), and Mundo Novo (a Bourbon-Typica that is also a parent plant of Catuai, developed by Brazilian agro-scientists) are only a few of the seemingly countless coffee types that originated in Brazil and, now, spread among coffee-growing countries everywhere.

 

brazil-origin2

 

Picking and Processing 

It’s hard to imagine the “beginnings” of coffee in Brazil, as the two things have become so synonymous. The first coffee plants were reportedly brought in the relatively early 18th century, spreading from the northern state of Pará in 1727 all the way down to Rio de Janerio within 50 years. Initially, coffee was grown almost exclusively for domestic consumption by European colonists, but as demand for coffee began to increase in United States and on the European continent in the early-mid 19th century, coffee supplies elsewhere in the world started to decline: Major outbreaks of coffee-leaf rust practically decimated the coffee-growing powerhouses of Java and Ceylon, creating an opening for the burgeoning coffee industry in Central and South America. Brazil’s size and the variety of its landscapes and microclimates showed incredible production potential, and its proximity to the United States made it an obvious and convenient export-import partner for the Western market.

In 1820, Brazil was already producing 30 percent of the world’s coffee supply, but by 1920, it accounted for 80 percent of the global total.

Since the 19th century, the weather in Brazil has been one of the liveliest topics of discussion among traders and brokers, and a major deciding factor in the global market trends and pricing that affect the coffee-commodity market. Incidents of frost and heavy rains have caused coffee yields to wax and wane over the past few decades, but the country is holding strong as one of the two largest coffee producers annually, along with Colombia.

One of the other interesting things Brazil has contributed to coffee worldwide is the number of varieties, mutant-hybrids, and cultivars that have sprung from here, either spontaneously or by laboratory creation. Caturra (a dwarf mutation of Bourbon variety), Maragogype (an oversize Typica derivative), and Mundo Novo (a Bourbon-Typica that is also a parent plant of Catuai, developed by Brazilian agro-scientists) are only a few of the seemingly countless coffee types that originated in Brazil and, now, spread among coffee-growing countries everywhere.

 

brazil-origin-1

 

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